Living in Sudan

Many westerners know Sudan only for the sad civil war that has torn the country apart for so many years. What they don’t often know, however, is that Sudan’s capital city of Khartoum is considered by many to be one of the safest and friendliest cities in the world. They may not know that northern Sudan, near the Egyptian border, boasts its own (much less crowded) pyramids. And they may not imagine an area where they will be asked to stop and enjoy a cup of tea several times each day – but this is what to expect in Sudan.
Teaching in Sudan allows teachers from around the world to experience some of Africa's warmest hospitality. It is an adventure for truly dedicated teachers; Nile Valley School hires educators of all levels; from classroom teachers to administrators.
In general, licensed teachers at Nile Valley School can expect to earn a salary that allows for a fair amount of savings, and provided accommodation and health insurance.

Cost of Living in Sudan

Sudan’s cost of living is lower than that of most Western countries. Though spending habits vary for every individual, teachers can usually expect to save a good portion of their salaries when teaching in Sudan.

Things for teachers to do in Sudan

Sudan does not have the major metropolises that can be found in many countries, but for teachers who prefer a non-urban lifestyle, Sudan’s cities and towns can be a welcome relief. Sudanese people are renowned for their friendliness and hospitality, and the slower pace of life in Sudan’s cities appeals to many teachers. Visitors to Khartoum often confirm the city’s reputation as one of the most friendly in the world. Sip tea with friends, and explore local markets for a variety of goods. Sudanese food is diverse and varies by region. Soups and other dishes made of vegetables, beef, fish, or mutton make up much of the cuisine, which is usually flavored with spices. Meals are often served communally.

Sudan Travel

Some of the most popular sightseeing in Sudan is in the north, where travelers can visit the country’s ancient pyramids. Though smaller than those of Egypt, Sudan’s are far less crowded and allow travelers to take in the sites and escape the tourist atmosphere of Egypt’s pyramids. Sudan’s beaches, on the coast of the Red Sea, provide beautiful, largely unspoiled environments for swimming and diving. The fact that Sudan has some of the best scuba diving in the world has been a well-kept secret until recently, when more and more tourists began traveling to Sudan’s coast. Teachers in Khartoum will also enjoy cultural activities such as the National Museum. Those who like to spend time outdoors can explore Tuti Island, a small patch of land located in the middle of two branches of the Nile.